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John

$39.00

FREE GIFT! 🎉

Free upgrade to blue light blocking lenses (worth $29)

Frame Width_ Narrow (130mm)

Measurements_ 52-21-149

Nose Bridge_ Standard

Material_ PC


There are different types of prescription lenses for your personal vision needs. The quality of the lenses, their characteristics and coatings all contribute to your satisfaction with the glasses. We will provide you with the most professional lens service. 

- Types Of Prescription Lenses -

< 1.Single Vision Lens >

What are single vision lenses?
Single vision glasses have lenses with only one focal point. Glasses for nearsightedness and farsightedness, as well as reading glasses can all belong to this family. They have one focus point and can only correct for vision for a single distance.

 

What can single vision lenses do?
Single vision glasses are sufficient for basic vision needs. It cannot provide higher-level accommodations such as correcting for multiple distances, reducing fatigue, or controlling brightness.

< 2. Progressive Lens >

What are progressive lenses?
Progressive lenses, have multiple focal points. They have three main fields of vision to accommodate viewing at a distance, intermediate, and reading close up. They give a better optical effect, providing you with a better experience.

- LENS COATING -

1.Classic coating
These are transparent lenses many people wear from day to day and can be replaced with the help of an optometrist.

2.Blue Light Blocking Coating
Protect your eyes from the blue lights emitted by phones and computers.

Protect your eyes from bluelight→

3.Light Responsive
The tone of the lens changes according to the amount of light around you. 

- LENS REFRACTIVE INDEX -

When you see numbers like 1.49, 1.56, 1.60, 1.67, 1.71, and 1.74 on the lens, they are referring to the refractive index of the lens.

1. Does higher refractive index mean better the quality?
The quality of the lens depends on how it was made and the material. The refractive index does not influence the quality of the lens. 
2.Does higher the refractive index mean thinner lens?
The thickness of the lens is not only determined by the refractive index but also the size of the frame, the degree of astigmatism and the pupillary distance. 

What is pupillary distance?

Pupillary distance (PD), or interpupillary distance (IPD), is the distance between the centers of the pupils when both eyes are looking straight. It is measured in millimeters.
The average PD for adults is between 54mm to 74mm, and for children, between 43mm to 58mm.

Why measure PD?

Pupillary distance (PD) has a huge influence on our comfort level when we wear glasses. You must provide your PD when filling out the prescription form on our website.

The pupillary distance (PD) between your eyes should match the distance between the center of your lenses, and the image should be clear.

< The suitable pair of glasses >

 

The PD of the eye deviates from the distance between the centers of the lenses. If PD is small, wearing large-frame glasses will cause focus deviation between the pupils and the centers of the lenses. 

< Oversized frame >

How is pupillary distance measured?

Your eyeglass prescription will usually come with pupillary distance (PD). What if you don’t know your PD?

 

Measure yourself
First, you need a ruler and a mirror.

Step 1
Stand upright and face the mirror, then align your face horizontally with the center of the mirror.
Step 2↓
Place the ruler above your eyebrows and make sure they’re parallel to your eyebrows and to the ground. The distance between your two pupils is your pupillary distance (PD). 

If your friend helping you measure your pupillary distance

1. Please open your eyes, look straight and don't tilt your head.
2. Ask your friend to place the 0 scale on the scale above the center of one pupil and note its distance to the center of the other pupil.

If you have questions about reading and filling out your prescription, the following images can help you understand the process.

This is what you’ll likely see. The top and/or the left side of the form usually include terms such as OD, OS, SPH, CYL, etc., either printed digitally or handwritten by a doctor or optometrist.

[ OS/OD ]
OS: Oculus sinister, meaning left eye; can also be represented by “L”.
OD: Oculus dexter, meaning right eye; can also be represented by “R”.
[ SPH ]
SPH is short for sphere. It shows your degree of myopia/hyperopia, in other words, nearsightedness/farsightedness.
A negative number here indicates myopia, therefore, -5.50D means 300 degrees of myopia.
A positive number here indicates hyperopia, therefore, + 2.50D means 250 degrees hyperopia.
[ CYL/AXIS ]
CYL is short for cylinder. It indicates your level of astigmatism, a condition where the cornea is irregularly shaped and causes blurred vision.
AXIS, the axis, describes the direction of astigmatism.
-1.00 means 100 degrees of astigmatism.
100 means that the astigmatism direction is 100 degrees.
[ PD ]
PD refers to pupillary distance, or the distance between your pupils.

How to fill out a  prescription form on our website?

< 1. single vision prescription >

Your single vision prescription
↓↓
Fill in the INMIX single vision prescription, as shown below, using the color coding as a guide.
↓↓

< 2.Progressive/varifocal prescription >

[ ADD ]
ADD (short for Reading Addition) It refers to the additional correction that you need for reading. If you’re looking for progressive or varifocal lenses, your prescription should include ADD data.

How to fill out a progressive/varifocal prescription form on our website?

Your prescription
↓↓
Fill in the INMIX progressive/varifocal vision prescription, as shown below, using the color coding as a guide.
↓↓

 

Includes frame case
and lens cloth.

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John

$39.00